Why Can’t the English?

Mr Higgins si interroga su quanti “inglesi” diversi ci sono e su quale inglese si debba pronunciare per non finire, nel migliore dei casi, a vendere violette per strada.
Ho ripensato a questa canzone dopo aver letto un articolo di glottodidattica che rifletteva sull’esigenza – rivelatasi a questo punto fittizia – di avere scambi linguistici con madrelinguisti:
chi può essere considerato un parlante nativo di una lingua?
e perché fare l’orecchio proprio alla sua pronuncia quando il 50% almeno delle nostre interazioni avverranno con parlanti non nativi?
Ma nella canzone ci sono, per me, almeno altri due motivi di interesse.
Uno è la frase geniale a proposito dei francesi e del francese: In Francia ogni francese conosce la sua lingua dalla “A” alla “Z”, anche se non si preoccupa tanto di quel che dice quanto di averlo pronunciato bene!
E per finire l’altro: la battuta di Mr Higgins che, nella versione del film doppiata in italiano, dice qualcosa come: Sei mesi e potrei trasformare questo ignobile sacchetto di stracci in una duchessa.
Bene, non so come mai, ma nel mio lessico famigliare si mantiene viva quell’espressione e spesso “l’ignobile sacchetto di stracci” sono io!
In attesa della trasformazione in duchessa, enjoy it!


Henry: – Look at her, a prisoner of the gutter,
Condemned by every syllable she ever uttered.
By law she should be taken out and hung,
For the cold-blooded murder of the English tongue.
Eliza:- Aaoooww!

Henry imitating her: – Aaoooww! Heaven’s! What a noise!
This is what the British population,
Calls an elementary education.

Pickering:- Oh, I think you picked a poor example.

Henry: – Did I? Hear them down in Soho square,
Dropping “h’s” everywhere.
Speaking English anyway they like.
You sir, did you go to school?
Man: – Wadaya tike me for, a fool?
Henry: – No one taught him ‘take’ instead of ‘tike!
Why can’t the English teach their children how to speak?
This verbal class distinction, by now,
Should be antique. If you spoke as she does, sir,
Instead of the way you do,
Why, you might be selling flowers, too!
Hear a Yorkshireman, or worse,
Hear a Cornishman converse,
I’d rather hear a choir singing flat.
Chickens cackling in a barn Just like this one!

Eliza: – Garn!

Henry: – I ask you, sir, what sort of word is that?
It’s “Aoooow” and “Garn” that keep her in her place.
Not her wretched clothes and dirty face.
Why can’t the English teach their children how to speak?
This verbal class distinction by now should be antique.
If you spoke as she does, sir, Instead of the way you do,
Why, you might be selling flowers, too.
An Englishman’s way of speaking absolutely classifies him,
The moment he talks he makes some other
Englishman despise him.
One common language I’m afraid we’ll never get.
Oh, why can’t the English learn to set
A good example to people whose
English is painful to your ears?
The Scotch and the Irish leave you close to tears.
There even are places where English completely
disappears. In America, they haven’t used it for years!
Why can’t the English teach their children how to speak?
Norwegians learn Norwegian; the Greeks have taught their
Greek. In France every Frenchman knows
his language fro “A” to “Zed”
The French never care what they do, actually,
as long as they pronounce in properly.
Arabians learn Arabian with the speed of summer lightning.
And Hebrews learn it backwards,
which is absolutely frightening.
But use proper English you’re regarded as a freak.
Why can’t the English,
Why can’t the English learn to speak?

Annunci

Rispondi

Inserisci i tuoi dati qui sotto o clicca su un'icona per effettuare l'accesso:

Logo WordPress.com

Stai commentando usando il tuo account WordPress.com. Chiudi sessione / Modifica )

Foto Twitter

Stai commentando usando il tuo account Twitter. Chiudi sessione / Modifica )

Foto di Facebook

Stai commentando usando il tuo account Facebook. Chiudi sessione / Modifica )

Google+ photo

Stai commentando usando il tuo account Google+. Chiudi sessione / Modifica )

Connessione a %s...